Canada-Wide Settlement: Seeking Justice for Opioid Victims

Purdue Pharma, the manufacturer of OxyContin and OxyNEO, has agreed to a monumental $20 million class action settlement in a pivotal legal development. This groundbreaking agreement, which has received judicial approval in Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia, and Saskatchewan, represents a significant stride toward accountability in pharmaceutical litigation.

The Opioid Emergency in Canada

Canada is grappling with a profound opioid crisis, and OxyContin has significantly exacerbated this public health emergency. According to data from the Government of Canada, opioid-related overdoses claimed the lives of over 17,000 individuals between January 2016 and September 2021 alone. There is an urgent need for intervention and continued accountability within the pharmaceutical industry.

OxyContin, a potent opioid pain reliever, gained widespread popularity in Canada following its introduction in the 1990s. Marketed as a revolutionary solution for chronic pain management, the drug’s high potency and addictive properties …

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Scientists Find Possible New Way to Reverse Fentanyl Overdoses

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Fentanyl overdoses are at an all-time high, and often, there is trouble reviving a person who has overdosed on higher doses of the drug. After all, fentanyl is one of the most potent drugs known to man.

Fentanyl is a highly potent opioid, estimated to be 50 to 100 times more powerful than morphine and about 50 times more potent than heroin. This potency means that a small amount of fentanyl can produce intense and immediate euphoria, making it highly attractive to those seeking a powerful high.

For some people, that high means an overdose. And if a user takes higher doses of the drug, multiple cans of Narcan, the overdose-reversal drug, may not even be enough.

Fentanyl kills over 100,000 Americans yearly, and people often don’t even realize they have taken the drug.

Fentanyl is Highly Addictive

Fentanyl acts …

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Narcan Goes OTC Nationwide Next Week

Narcan, also known by its generic name naloxone, is a medication used to reverse the effects of opioid overdose rapidly. This is a crucial tool in addressing the opioid crisis and has proven to be a lifesaving intervention in many cases. After much advocacy, the federal government is allowing naloxone to be sold over-the-counter, without a prescription, starting next week.

The Importance of Narcan

Narcan has been a vital tool in saving lives since the 1970s. Now, it can be carried and used by anyone who comes across an overdose situation, making it more likely they get care and medical help.

  • Rapid Overdose Rescue: Narcan binds to the same receptors in the brain that opioids attach to. By doing this, it effectively displaces opioids and reverses their effects. This can quickly restore normal breathing and consciousness in someone experiencing
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Fentanyl Overdose May Be Stopped with Monoclonal Antibody Treatment

A fentanyl overdose may be reversed with the help of Narcan, but sometimes the drug is too powerful to respond. Now a company has gotten a green light for a project that explores the use of monoclonal antibodies in helping reverse a fentanyl overdose.

As a street drug, fentanyl can have different potency levels each time a user tries it. And often, the user doesn’t know where it is in the drug. Instead, they expected to get high on cocaine, meth, heroin, or Oxy. It can be 50-100 times as potent as morphine, so a person who doesn’t use opioids is highly susceptible to an overdose.

What Is a Monoclonal Antibody Treatment?

One of the most well-known applications of monoclonal antibody therapy is in treating certain cancers, such as breast cancer, lymphoma, and leukemia. During the COVID-19 pandemic, monoclonal antibodies …

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Chronic Pain May Make Opioid Use Disorder Worse

Researchers following the data for people with fibromyalgia and opioid use disorder found that people with chronic pain may have more challenges when staying sober.

Chronic Pain and Opioid Exposure

Many people first use opioids to treat pain. Physical pain can significantly contribute to the development of opioid use disorder. Opioids are commonly prescribed to manage chronic pain; over time, people may develop a tolerance to the medication. They may require higher doses to achieve the same pain relief. As a result, individuals may become physically dependent on opioids, which can lead to opioid use disorder.

Most people’s first exposure to opioids is through an illness or injury where a doctor prescribes drugs like Percocet or Oxycontin.

Chronic Illness and Opioid Misuse

Chronic pain can increase the risk of addiction, overdose, and other adverse effects.

There is also a chance …

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Para-fluorofentanyl Increasingly Found In Fatal Overdoses

Para-flourofentanyl, a fentanyl analog that is even stronger than its predecessor, has increasingly been found in the blood of overdose victims, according to a report by the CDC. While many people may not be aware they’re taking the drug, it’s now commonly added to counterfeit fentanyl pills, often with deadly results.

What Is Para-fluorofentanyl?

Para-Fluorofentanyl is an opioid analgesic analog of fentanyl, a drug commonly used in surgeries due to its painkilling and sedative powers. Fentanyl is the top cause of overdose deaths in the United States and is often found as an additive to drugs. Many users who are inexperienced with opioids end up overdosing when exposed for the first time.

Initially developed by Janssen Pharmaceutica in the 1960s,  p-Fluorofentanyl never made it to market. Amateur chemists tried to sell it on the streets in the early 1980s. However, …

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Cherokee Nation Gets 75$ Million Of Opioid Settlement Money

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The Cherokee Nation has accepted a settlement of 75 million dollars from three of the nation’s largest drug distributors, AmerisourceBergen, Cardinal Health, and McKesson. The money is a settlement from a lawsuit that accused the companies of shipping large quantities of highly addictive pain pills for over 20 years, propelling the opioid crisis and creating a public health emergency for communities across the country.

The settlement is the first of its kind to give money to Native American communities, whose populations, leaders say, are disproportionately affected by the opioid crisis.

The Settlement Money Will Go To Healing

“This settlement will enable us to increase our investments in mental health treatment facilities and other programs to help our people recover,” Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. told reporters.

The settlement will fund much-needed treatment and mental health services for …

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Beware of “Alternative” Treatment Programs Like Enthusiastic Recovery

Many programs and treatment centers bill themselves as a little less traditional than the standard 12-step model. Many of these programs are supervised by medical and addiction treatment professionals. Other groups, like Enthusiastic Sobriety and its subsidiaries, are run by people who were also once addicted.

Many of these people are in recovery, attend 12-step meetings and work on themselves. What sets Enthusiastic Sobriety apart from these programs is the lack of self-improvement as a goal.

What is Enthusiastic Sobriety?

Enthusiastic Sobriety is a program that first emerged in the 1970s and is run by Bob Meehan, an ex-con. For decades, parents have paid top dollar for his unconventional “drug treatment” program. For the most part, he helps teens get clean and sober off of substances. He does not, however, believe in helping them change their lifestyle or behavior. And …

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Virginia Is Out Of Treatment Beds

Like many parts of the country, Virginia has been battling an opioid epidemic over the past several years. During the pandemic, resources often dried up or closed down, leaving many vulnerable clients to relapse or desperately seeking shelter. Now that the pandemic’s emergency is winding down, the state still doesn’t have enough resources to help people get clean and sober.

Increasing Overdoses in Virginia, Nationwide

The pandemic brought a large number of overdoses as people began to turn to despair. In 2020, the Virginia Department of Health tallied 2,297 fatal drugs, a number that authorities say is more than all of the gun and car crash-related deaths reported in the same year.

While addiction is a pressing public health issue, there still aren’t enough services for people in the state. Inpatient beds are sorely lacking, while outpatient clinics are often …

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Biden Reduces Barriers With New Opioid MAT Guidance

Late last month, the Biden administration took action to significantly reduce barriers to one of the most effective opioid treatments, a Medication-Assisted Treatment known by the name Suboxone or buprenorphine. With the new guidelines, there will be significantly fewer requirements for medical professionals to help people with opioid addiction. The new policy will give more people access to safe and effective treatment to help them get sober. It will help people who live in rural areas without drug treatment centers, too.

Reduced MAT Training Requirement

Prior requirements for prescribing medication like Suboxone were stringent. A doctor had to take a 30-hour training course and become recertified every year. Doctors also had to ensure the patient went to treatment or therapy as a requirement for MAT. Some doctors felt like they were forced to be treatment counselors, a burden that made …

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