Canada-Wide Settlement: Seeking Justice for Opioid Victims

Purdue Pharma, the manufacturer of OxyContin and OxyNEO, has agreed to a monumental $20 million class action settlement in a pivotal legal development. This groundbreaking agreement, which has received judicial approval in Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia, and Saskatchewan, represents a significant stride toward accountability in pharmaceutical litigation.

The Opioid Emergency in Canada

Canada is grappling with a profound opioid crisis, and OxyContin has significantly exacerbated this public health emergency. According to data from the Government of Canada, opioid-related overdoses claimed the lives of over 17,000 individuals between January 2016 and September 2021 alone. There is an urgent need for intervention and continued accountability within the pharmaceutical industry.

OxyContin, a potent opioid pain reliever, gained widespread popularity in Canada following its introduction in the 1990s. Marketed as a revolutionary solution for chronic pain management, the drug’s high potency and addictive properties …

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Purdue Pharma Plans Guilty Plea For Opioid Charges

OxyContin manufacturer Purdue Pharma is on the cusp of reaching a guilty plea agreement regarding criminal charges linked to its purported involvement in exacerbating the opioid epidemic in the United States, according to exclusive information obtained by Reuters.

This potential plea deal forms part of a larger settlement to resolve U.S. Department of Justice investigations.

Insiders suggest that the agreement, which may involve significant financial penalties amounting to billions of dollars, could be made public within the forthcoming fortnight. However, the ongoing negotiations mean that the terms of the plea deal remain subject to change.

Purdue’s Role in Fueling the Crisis

Federal prosecutors and state attorneys have accused Purdue Pharma of employing aggressive marketing tactics to promote OxyContin, a highly addictive painkiller.

It’s alleged that the company downplayed the drug’s potential for abuse and overdosing, contributing to its widespread use …

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Purdue Pharma Deal Goes To Supreme Court

The opioid crisis is now at the forefront of the Supreme Court’s attention, and justices heard arguments earlier this month regarding a challenge to the bankruptcy deal intended to compensate victims of the highly addictive painkiller OxyContin.

In this case, Purdue Pharma, the manufacturer of OxyContin, agreed to pay billions of dollars to those harmed by the opioid epidemic under a deal approved by a lower court.

The deal shields members of the Sackler family, who owned and ran the company, from personal liability. The Sacklers were known for their aggressive promotion and deceptive marketing of OxyContin.

Oxycontin’s Devastating Effects

OxyContin, a powerful prescription painkiller, played a significant role in fueling the addiction crisis that is still raging in the United States.

Introduced in 1996 by Purdue Pharma, OxyContin contained oxycodone, an opioid that provided relief for patients experiencing …

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Opioid Lawsuits Are Bankrupting Rite-Aid

While there have been many stories about rampant crime in major cities, the fact is that these same cities also have a lot of opioid addiction. In recent years, states, counties, and cities have been suing distributors of opioids like Oxycontin. While many companies, such as the drug maker Purdue Pharma, have settled, some distributors and pharmacies have had issues. Rite-Aid is one of these pharmacies that chose not to participate in a bulk settlement. Because of this, they face more than a thousand lawsuits for their sales of Oxycontin and other addictive pain pills.

Rite-Aid in Danger of Closing

Rite-Aid is one of the largest chains of pharmacies in the United States, but they now face billions of dollars in death and risk closure due to outstanding opioid lawsuits. Not settling, as other pharmacies have done, including Walgreens, …

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Chronic Pain May Make Opioid Use Disorder Worse

Researchers following the data for people with fibromyalgia and opioid use disorder found that people with chronic pain may have more challenges when staying sober.

Chronic Pain and Opioid Exposure

Many people first use opioids to treat pain. Physical pain can significantly contribute to the development of opioid use disorder. Opioids are commonly prescribed to manage chronic pain; over time, people may develop a tolerance to the medication. They may require higher doses to achieve the same pain relief. As a result, individuals may become physically dependent on opioids, which can lead to opioid use disorder.

Most people’s first exposure to opioids is through an illness or injury where a doctor prescribes drugs like Percocet or Oxycontin.

Chronic Illness and Opioid Misuse

Chronic pain can increase the risk of addiction, overdose, and other adverse effects.

There is also a chance …

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Pain Management Intervention Reduces Opioid Use

According to a study on a hospital intervention program for people with thyroid cancer operations, preoperative counseling and having multiple ways to control pain reduced the amount of opioids patients needed. Post-operative opioid prescriptions were dramatically reduced among many thyroid cancer patients discharged. Because of personalized medication management, fewer people took opioids home from the hospital.

Supporting Patients’ Pain Management Individual Needs

The study’s findings were retrospective and focused on thyroid cancer surgery. The study showed that hospitalized people needed very small amounts of postoperative opioid medication for pain management. The authors wrote that offering multiple types of pain management helped manage pain. “Adequate postoperative pain control was achieved using non-opioid interventions. Implementing an intervention to decrease the quantity of unnecessarily prescribed opioid medications during hospital discharge may help to reduce the risk of opioid addiction and overdose in patients …

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Prosecutors Says Insys Bribed 5 NYC Doctors to Prescribe Fentanyl

Five New York City doctors allegedly took at least $800,000 from Insys Therapeutics Inc., to prescribe the spray version of fentanyl, a highly addictive opioid that has been known to cause overdose deaths across the country. According to a 75-page indictment that the Manhattan federal court released on Friday, all the defendants pleaded not-guilty to the charges, which included conspiracy to describe the efforts to overprescribe the medication.

The doctors had been “working” for the company’s ‘Speakers Bureau’ for four years starting back in 2012. However, their positions were a way to hide the fact that the “speech” part of the job description was a farce.

According to the New York Times, Insys paid more than $100,000 annually to at least two of the doctors. The indictment also says that Insys funneled the illegal payments to the doctors through …

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“Enormous” Fentanyl Ring Uncovered in Utah

Fentanyl, a dangerous narcotic that is 50 to 100 times more powerful than morphine, has become a drug that is central the opiate epidemic in many hard-hit areas. For many people, fentanyl is a drug that’s unfamiliar, and many drug users e are unaware of its potency or the added potential for overdose. Fentanyl pills are nearly identical to Oxycontin in size and shape and often have been sold masquerading as oxy on the street. A recent fentanyl ring uncovered in Utah sheds light on how and where these pills are manufactured and how they are distributed.

Federal agents uncovered a fentanyl ring (allegedly) being run by a young man who is a member of the Church of Latter Day Saints, local news station KSL reported. Prosecutors are looking into the possibility that at least 28 deaths are tied to …

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Opioid Commission Holds First Meeting

On Friday June 16, 2017 the newly formed Opioid Commission held their first meeting in the White House. It was attended by some of the more influential players from within Donald Trumps’s circle. Most notably at the helm of the meeting was Governor Chris Christie of New Jersey who is the chairman of the President’s Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis. 

Notable Attendees:

  • Tom Price, Secretary of Health and Human Services
  • David Shulkin, Secretary of Veteran Affairs
  • Kellyanne Conway, Trump Adviser 
  • Jared Kushner, Senior Trump Adviser 
  • Charlie Baker, Governor of Massachusetts
  • Roy Cooper, Governor of North Carolina
  • Patrick Kennedy, former congressman
  • Dr. Bertha Madras,  Harvard Medical Professional

Given the list of names and considering the seriousness of the problem United States is facing with the opioid crisis it appears that this administration is ramping up its efforts

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Older Americans and Prescription Drug Abuse

New research is sounding the alarm about prescription painkiller abuse among older Americans. The research, which was presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry (AAAP), reports that roughly 20% of Americans over age 65 take analgesic medication for chronic pain several times per week. Among that group, the rate of prescription drug abuse or addiction is 18%.

There are currently 38 million adults over age 65 represent in the U.S, representing 13% of the total population. One third of all prescriptions are written for this group. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA), 2.8 million seniors abuse prescription drugs. By 2020, seniors will represent 20% of the population and SAMHSA estimates that 4.4 million will abuse drugs.

Many experts believe that aging Baby Boomers are more likely than their parents to …

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