Critics Say California Resistant to Strengthened Overdose Reversal Drugs

Fentanyl, a drug that is up to 100 times stronger than morphine, has become a common adulterant in street drugs. Officials say this is the reason so many fentanyl encounters result in death; most people don’t mean to take it. When an opioid-naïve user ends up ingesting fentanyl, sometimes the drugs are so potent that normal-strength Naloxone, an opioid reversal drug, has little effect. EMTs have anecdotes of using multiple cans of fentanyl to attempt to bring fentanyl overdoses back to life. However, stronger and more effective opioid-reversal drugs are available.

Fentanyl Overdoses Are Becoming More Common

Fentanyl is now found in cocaine, heroin, speed, and counterfeit pills such as Xanax or Oxycontin. And they’re easier to get than ever. Law enforcement finds drug dealers on Snapchat, Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and Signal. When one forum becomes risky to use for …

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Para-fluorofentanyl Increasingly Found In Fatal Overdoses

Para-flourofentanyl, a fentanyl analog that is even stronger than its predecessor, has increasingly been found in the blood of overdose victims, according to a report by the CDC. While many people may not be aware they’re taking the drug, it’s now commonly added to counterfeit fentanyl pills, often with deadly results.

What Is Para-fluorofentanyl?

Para-Fluorofentanyl is an opioid analgesic analog of fentanyl, a drug commonly used in surgeries due to its painkilling and sedative powers. Fentanyl is the top cause of overdose deaths in the United States and is often found as an additive to drugs. Many users who are inexperienced with opioids end up overdosing when exposed for the first time.

Initially developed by Janssen Pharmaceutica in the 1960s,  p-Fluorofentanyl never made it to market. Amateur chemists tried to sell it on the streets in the early 1980s. However, …

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Fentanyl Overdoses Among The Young Are Killing

Young people are getting back together in real life, and with that socializing comes new experiences. Kids are being kids, pushing boundaries, partying, and rebelling. Snapchat, TikTok, and other apps put things like Molly pills and other club drugs in their hands overnight. Many of the drug dealers drop off packages in mailboxes at night. And the drug users, aged as young as fourteen or as old as in their 30s, don’t have the experience or know-how to test their drugs for fentanyl. And due to their lack of opioid exposure, this leads to overdoses – and death. Teens and young adults are overdosing at record rates.

Why Are Drugs Tainted With Fentanyl?

Nobody knows just one reason for drugs being tainted with fentanyl. Often the powder for club drugs and opioids comes from overseas. Drug dealers may mix the …

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Fentanyl Is The Leading Cause Of Death Among Young And Middle-Aged Adults

For adults aged 18-45, fentanyl is the most common cause of death in the United States of America, according to new data from the CDC. The deaths outnumbered car wrecks, alcohol-related deaths (which also increased), and cancer. Fentanyl is here to stay, and it’s killing young people. Why is it the leading cause of death? What can people do to help prevent these deaths, individuals, or communities?

Fentanyl Is Often An Adulterant

Many people who overdose on fentanyl have no idea they are taking it. This may sound like an exaggeration, but it’s true. Fentanyl has been found as an adulterant on both the East and the West Coast. It’s been added to cocaine, meth, molly, and opioid pills sold as Oxy.

There has even been a case of fentanyl added to black-market marijuana in California.

It’s not clear …

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