Purdue Pharma is seeking 6 Year Old Kids For Oxycontin Study

  Purdue Pharma is looking for six year-old kids to take OxyContin Makers of OxyContin Purdue Pharma are currently recruiting participants for a clinical study in the treatment of moderate and severe pain. This are the eligibility standards that Purdue Pharma submitted on March of 2011: Ages Eligible for Study:       6 Years to 16 Years Genders Eligible for Study:       Both Accepts Healthy Volunteers:       No Criteria Inclusion Criteria include: •    Male and female patients aged 6 to 16 years, inclusive, who are expected to require ongoing around-the-clock opioid treatment equivalent to at least 20-mg daily dose of oxycodone for at least 2 weeks for management of moderate to severe (based on the investigator's judgment) malignant or nonmalignant pain. •    Patients must be opioid tolerant, ie, have been treated with opioids for at least the 5 consecutive days prior to dosing and with at least 20 mg daily of oxycodone or the equivalent during at least the last 48 hours prior to the start of study drug dosing…

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Heroin Use is Rising and Fueled by OxyContin

Heroin Use on the Rise       Like clothing styles, the popularity of some illegal drugs goes in and out of fashion.  Heroin, which saw a surge of popularity in the 1960s and 1970s, was eclipsed by Ecstasy and cocaine in the decades that followed.  Now heroin use is once again on the rise. A recent article in the Chicago Sun-Times reported that heroin use in the suburbs of Chicago increased by 46 percent between 2008 and 2009.  Further evidence was reported in an Associate Press survey of 36 states which found that heroin deaths rose 20 percent from 2006 to 2008. Increased Availability of Heroin The U.S. Department of Justice attributes the rise in heroin abuse  in part to the increased availability of the drug.  Its National Drug Threat Assessment for 2010 reports that heroin is widely available in parts America and that availability is increasing in many other areas.  As a result, the price of the drug is decreasing and the number of heroin-related overdoses and…

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The Facts about Prescription Drug Addiction

Prescription drugs are currently one of the most abused categories of drugs in America, surpassed only by marijuana.  They are even more widely abused than street drugs like methamphetamine, cocaine and heroin.  Part of the attraction of prescription drugs is that they are relatively easy to obtain from doctors or prescription drug dealers.  They can be found in the medicine cabinets of many households, easily accessible to family members and visitors.  As a result, a growing number of people are abusing prescription drugs and becoming addicted. The National Institutes of Health has reported that an estimated 20 percent of people in the U.S. have used prescription drugs for non-medical reasons.  The most highly addictive prescription drugs are narcotic painkillers (OxyContin, Vicodin, Percocet), tranquilizers (Valium, Xanax, Ativan) and stimulants (Adderall, Ritalin). Prescription steroids, which increase muscle mass and may be prescribed for muscle-wasting conditions like cancer and AIDS, are also subject to abuse by athletes and non-athletes who want to improve their appearance or performance.  The non-medical use of steroids…

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Florida’s Oxy Express

Florida has become ground zero for the prescription drug epidemic in America.  In communities like Fort Lauderdale, once a popular tourist destination and yachting center, drug dealers have set up shop in strip mall “pain clinics.”  Instead of selling crack or heroin, these dealers are pushing powerful prescription drugs like oxycodone, a narcotic painkiller that is marketed under the names OxyContin, Roxicodone and Oxyfast.  The pain clinics, referred to as "pill mills" by law enforcement officials, make it easy for addicts to obtain powerful prescription narcotics. National Public Radio recently reported that doctors in Florida write 10 times as many prescriptions for oxycodone as all the other U.S. states combined. Florida pain clinics operated by disreputable physicians attract people from all along the eastern seaboard.  A typical visit to one of these clinics consists of a quick exam and a prescription for a painkiller like OxyContin.  Many clinics are also equipped to fill prescriptions.  Drug addicts and dealers who sell oxycodone on the street are able to walk out…

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Prescription Drugs on Campus – Oxy and Adderall Are Being Abused

Illicit drugs like cocaine and ecstasy are no longer the primary drugs of choice on college campuses.  In the past decade, the non-medical use of prescription drugs has skyrocketed among college students.  A 2010 survey of approximately 95,000 college students by the American College Health Association revealed that 15% of students admit to using prescription drugs without a prescription. The types of drugs most commonly abused and the percent of students using them include: •    Pain killers – 9.3% (includes OxyContin and Vicodin) •    Stimulants – 7% (includes Adderall, Ritalin, Concerta) •    Sedatives – 4.5% (includes Xanax, Valium) •    Antidepressants – 3.2% (includes Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil) Prescription drugs are readily available to college students.  According to research from the University of Michigan, most students obtain prescription drugs from family and friends.  Another source is physicians who overmedicate minor medical problems.  Many student health centers are understaffed, averaging 1 health professional per 2,000 students.  Due to time limitations, it’s often easier for a doctor to write a prescription for student…

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Billboard of the Day

Someday, it will all just be a memory. This billboard speaks for itself and the messag it carries is being echoed far and wide.  OxyContin (and other prescription medications) are addictive and deadly. It is through grass roots actions like this that the hearts and minds of Americans are being won over and the perception of OxyContin is changing to reflect more accurately how addictive and deadly the drug is. The tide is turning as new actions develop. Some examples: - CVS Announces it is blacklisting inordinate prescribers of narcotic painkillers (in Florida) - Doctors in Florida are facing  increasing punishment for unethical prescribing behavior - There is a powerful "grass roots" movement to raise awareness about OxyContin - Pharmaceutical Executives are being punished for irresponsibly unleashing this drug on the populace - Shocking (and often deadly) pharmacy robberies are occurring more and more frequently Read our blog, join us on facebook, or follow us on twitter to spread this message and be a part of the solution.

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Ontario Canada – Florida’s Replacement (for Oxy Addicts)

In Ontario Canada, researchers found that physicians are over-prescribing narcotic pain killers. Ontario drug researchers are linking this six year investigation to the reason for an increase addiction and deaths caused by prescription drugs in their region. Efforts are in the works trying to curb addiction and monitor those that are being prescribed the narcotics. Will Ontario become a smuggler's paradise? Will it feed the lower 48 states with Oxy and other drugs once Florida gets its act together and handles the prescription drug epidemic there? The province’s public drug plan for Canadians in Ontario covers prescription narcotic pain killers. Research done by Ontario Drug Policy Research Network discovered that the plan was exceeding the amount of doses set out in Canadian clinical guidelines. Tara Gomes who is the project leader and epidemiologist for the Ontario Drug Policy Research Network, published on Tuesday in the journal of Open Medicine that prescription rates for all opioids rose 16.2% between 2003 through 2008. The Ontario Drug Policy Research Network did a…

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