Prescription Drugs on Campus – Oxy and Adderall Are Being Abused

Illicit drugs like cocaine and ecstasy are no longer the primary drugs of choice on college campuses.  In the past decade, the non-medical use of prescription drugs has skyrocketed among college students.  A 2010 survey of approximately 95,000 college students by the American College Health Association revealed that 15% of students admit to using prescription drugs without a prescription. The types of drugs most commonly abused and the percent of students using them include: •    Pain killers – 9.3% (includes OxyContin and Vicodin) •    Stimulants – 7% (includes Adderall, Ritalin, Concerta) •    Sedatives – 4.5% (includes Xanax, Valium) •    Antidepressants – 3.2% (includes Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil) Prescription drugs are readily available to college students.  According to research from the University of Michigan, most students obtain prescription drugs from family and friends.  Another source is physicians who overmedicate minor medical problems.  Many student health centers are understaffed, averaging 1 health professional per 2,000 students.  Due to time limitations, it’s often easier for a doctor to write a prescription for student…

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Ontario Canada – Florida’s Replacement (for Oxy Addicts)

In Ontario Canada, researchers found that physicians are over-prescribing narcotic pain killers. Ontario drug researchers are linking this six year investigation to the reason for an increase addiction and deaths caused by prescription drugs in their region. Efforts are in the works trying to curb addiction and monitor those that are being prescribed the narcotics. Will Ontario become a smuggler's paradise? Will it feed the lower 48 states with Oxy and other drugs once Florida gets its act together and handles the prescription drug epidemic there? The province’s public drug plan for Canadians in Ontario covers prescription narcotic pain killers. Research done by Ontario Drug Policy Research Network discovered that the plan was exceeding the amount of doses set out in Canadian clinical guidelines. Tara Gomes who is the project leader and epidemiologist for the Ontario Drug Policy Research Network, published on Tuesday in the journal of Open Medicine that prescription rates for all opioids rose 16.2% between 2003 through 2008. The Ontario Drug Policy Research Network did a…

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One Clear Sign of an Epidemic: Pharmacy Robberies

The addiction for pharmaceuticals is at an all time high. One consequence is that there has been an unprecedented number of robberies at major chain pharmacies. As other crimes across the nation are seeing reductions, this crime that is increasing. Major pharmacies have had to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars upgrading security. The penalties are stiff, and once caught  the perpetrators get a rude awaking of the federal system. Coast to Coast Pharmacy Crimes Knoxville Suffers: One area where there has been a rise in prescription drug armed robberies is Knoxville Tennessee.  Authorities  have noticed a drastic increase in drug store robberies in the past year.  Knoxville police department shows that robberies jumped from 26 to 44 from 2009 to 2010.     In the month of December 2010 investigators worked on ten cases - including one day where there were three separate attempts. Already in January of this year, authorities have already started investigating five cases, where three of them happened at the same location. In San Diego…

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New Formula of Oxy Leads to Heroin Abuse, Addiction

It has been almost a year since the U.S. Food and Drug Administration released their new formulation for OxyContin. The FDA released the new design of the tablet to help prevent the illegal misuse and abuse of the pain relieving drug. As successful as the new formula may be, the new version is causing authorities across the nation new stress. Authorities have been noticing a rise in more individuals turning to heroin to get the sensation of euphoria that at one time OxyContin was able to fulfill. On April 5, 2010 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the new formulation of the time controlled-release drug OxyContin. OxyContin is made to slowly release potent opioid oxycodone into patients that require management of a continuous around-the-clock pain suppressant. However, because of OxyContin’s time-released formula, each tablet contains large doses of oxycodone. With the old formula, individuals could release the high levels of oxycodone all at once. This leads to the illegal misuse and abuse of the tablet, which have resulted…

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Addiction Professional’s Take on the Silent Epidemic

Our addiction counselor Tif B had the below to say about this excellent article on Novasans.com. "This is a subject that needs to have this kind of discussion and exposure. The increase in prescription drug addiction has been steadily increasing for several years. There is also a perception by the general public, that because it is "prescribed" and is legal, there is not a danger of addiction. Once addicted to the pain killers, the person will "create" pains and see their doctors more often, for further prescriptions. Most doctors will question or refuse to prescribe more. The person who is addicted will then get creative and either buys them in the streets or go “doctor shopping". "Doctor shopping" is the process of the person going from doctor to doctor, until they get a doctor that will prescribe what they want. Some of these people, who have become addicted, will have several doctors they will shop. They will also use several different pharmacies, as to not be detected. One of…

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OxyContin Part of Dramatic Rise in ER Visits

In 2009, more than 1.2 million people were treated in hospital emergency rooms for the non medical use of prescription and over-the-counter drugs.  This number has more than doubled in recent years, from about 500,000 visits in 2004.  For the first time, the number of emergency room visits for the non-medical use of both prescription and over-the-counter drugs surpassed the number of visits for illicit drug abuse. The figures were based on a study conduction by the Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN), a government program that monitors ER visits and deaths caused by drugs.  According to DAWN, the prescription drugs that were most often involved in ER visits were: Opioids, which are used to relieve pain and include oxycodone (brand names OxyContin and Roxicodone), hydrocone and methadone. Benzodiazepines, which are used to treat anxiety and insomnia and include the brands Xanax, Klonapin, Valium and Ativan. Zolpidem (brand name Ambien), a sleep aid. The alarming rise in prescription drug abuse includes both sexes and all ages, including teens and young…

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Analyzing Statisitcs about Addiction to Painkillers

Do The Math About Addiction Rates Mark Twain once wrote that there are three kinds of lies: lies, damn lies, and statistics. Perhaps there’s some truth in the author-humorist’s line because we’ve all heard enough statistics in our lifetimes to make a grown man cry! It’s often difficult to get to the truth when someone throws a bunch of scholarly-sounding numbers at us, and proving statistical information is a lost cause unless you’re a researcher with nothing else to do. The following statistics were taken from a web site for “The Waismann Method” and refers to this treatment center’s program of rapid detoxification from prescription painkilling opiate drugs. It cites information gained from the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse. Two million Americans use prescription painkillers each year In some areas of the country, addiction to painkillers has overtaken that of cocaine and marijuana About 9% of Americans have used painkillers illegally (without a prescription) in their lifetimes About 1.6 million Americans used painkillers for non-medical reasons since 1998…

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